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    Zora Neale Hurston's Characteristics of Negro Expression

    £5.85
    £6.50
    Price-Match is available in-store for recommended titles in CCCU module handbooks
    ISBN: 9781912128112
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    Attribute nameAttribute value
    AuthorAguirre, Mercedes
    Pub Date15/07/2017
    BindingPaperback
    Pages94
    Publisher: Macat International Limited
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    In this 1920 collection of early critical essays, Eliot proposes rules for how a poet should relate to a poem and to the poetic tradition. Arguing against the Romantic tradition of self-expression, Eliot proposes instead that poetry should express universal values and emotions.

    The racial prejudices of 1930s America were many, and included a common presumption that African American art was unoriginal - merely poorly copying white culture.
    African-American novelist, anthropologist and essayist Zora Neale Hurston crushingly evaluated such assumptions in her 1934 essay `Characteristics of Negro Expression.' While Hurston's approach and premises seem in many ways dated to modern readers, the essay still shows an incisive mind carefully evaluating arguments and cutting them down to size. African-American art of the time did not - Hurston influentially argued - play by the same rules as white art, so it could not meaningfully be discussed by `white' notions of aesthetic value.
    Where white European tradition views art as something fixed, Hurston saw African-American art works as a distinctive form of mimicry, reshaping and altering the original object until it became something new and novel. In this way, she contended, African-American creative expression is a process that generates its own form of originality - turning borrowed material into something original and unique. By carefully evaluating the relevance of previous arguments, Hurston showed African American artistic expression in an entirely new light.