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Law and Order in Anglo-Saxon England

Author: Lambert, Tom
Binding: Hardback
Pages: 416
Pub Date: 16/02/2017
ISBN: 9780198786313
Availability: Out of Stock
Price-Match is available in-store only for recommended titles in CCCU module handbooks
Quick overview The only modern book-length account of Anglo-Saxon legal culture and practice, from the pre-Christian laws of Aethelberht of Kent (c. 600) up to the Norman conquest of 1066, charting the development of kings' involvement in law, in terms both of their authority to legislate and their ability to influence local practice.
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Law and Order in Anglo-Saxon England explores English legal culture and practice across the Anglo-Saxon period, beginning with the essentially pre-Christian laws enshrined in writing by King Aethelberht of Kent in c. 600 and working forward to the Norman Conquest of 1066. It attempts to escape the traditional retrospective assumptions of legal history, focused on the late twelfth-century Common Law, and to establish a new interpretative framework for the subject, more sensitive to contemporary cultural assumptions and practical realities. The focus of the volume is on the maintenance of order: what constituted good order; what forms of wrongdoing were threatening to it; what roles kings, lords, communities, and individuals were expected to play in maintaining it; and how that worked in practice. Its core argument is that the Anglo-Saxons had a coherent, stable, and enduring legal order that lacks modern analogies: it was neither state-like nor stateless, and needs to be understood on its

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